51 Portuguese Idioms – Speak Like a Brazilian

51-portuguese-idioms

Learn 51 Brazilian Portuguese street smart words & expressions in the context of 102 everyday situations.

  • Follow seven Brazilian characters as they go about their daily lives
  • Learn colloquial expressions in the context of real-life situations
  • Get to know more about Brazil through our Cultural Notes
  • Improve your grammar with pointers to online free content
  • Build current vocabulary for personal and professional relationships

Available in your preferred format: PaperbackKindleNook, and iBook.

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Product Description

“Learning and understanding everyday phrases in Portuguese allows the student to take their head out of the traditional textbooks and gain insight into Brazilian culture.” Adam Lee, Author of Eyes on Brazil

51 Portuguese Idioms is more than a phrase book or a slang dictionary. You will learn each expression inside a real-life context: everyday situations that could happen to any of us. You will also learn a lot of additional vocabulary. We created the Portuguese/English sentences thinking of useful content for your social and professional lives.

Available in your preferred format: PaperbackKindleNook, and iBook.

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A must for any non-native speaker!

I’ve been studying Portuguese for about a year- enough time to know the basics and some intermediate concepts, but not really enough to FULLY understand how everything works. One of my biggest worries is having the opportunity to speak with a native and sounding like a textbook. I grew up in a place (New England) that isn’t exactly a hotbed of Brazilian culture, so I had no clue about much of the slang and “inside jokes” that are so common in the language. Not only does this book help in expanding the reader’s awareness of “street smart” phrases, but it also showcases and explains how these phrases came to be in the context of Brazilian society. It provides information in short, memorable situations that keep the reader involved, but not overwhelmed… Because each phrase is a lesson in itself, you can easily put the book down after only a few pages. The end result is a useful and fun read that learners of all levels will get a kick out of!

Barnes & Noble website

Very Useful Book

I found this book very useful. It is surprising how much you use colloquial expressions in your own language from day to day without realising that they are! I use these new expressions all the time now.

Amazon.com

“While editing 51 Portuguese Idioms, I came across roughly 15 phrases that I hadn’t seen before. It’s not as if I just started learning Portuguese last year or anything, because in reality, I’ve been doing it for close to a decade. The fact that 51 Portuguese Idioms goes beyond all that I have seen and heard while dealing with aspects of Brazilian culture and the Portuguese language on a daily basis is no small feat. Another important aspect of learning colloquial expressions is that they take you beyond the typical exercises of verbal conjugations and syntax memorization. Learning and understanding everyday phrases in Portuguese allows the student to take their head out of the traditional textbooks and gain insight into Brazilian culture.”
– Adam Lee, Author of Eyes On Brazil

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7. Bater perna (por/em)

Situation 1

Cibele’s mother lives in Salvador. Cibele is writing an e-mail to her mother:

“Oi mãe, tudo bem? Hoje passei o dia batendo perna pela Rua 25 de Março e comprei uma lembrancinha para você. Saudades.”

Translation: Hi mom, how are you? I spent the day strolling around 25 de Março Street and I bought a souvenir for you. I miss you.

Cultural Note

Rua 25 de Março is actually more than just one street. It is an area near downtown São Paulo known for its very active commerce. You can pretty much find everything in the Rua 25 de Março shops, and prices are usually lower than anywhere else. During the holiday season, large crowds stroll the streets of 25 de Março looking for good deals.

Situation 2

Ana is getting ready to move to Los Angeles. Today she had several errands to run and walked a lot to get everything done. When Fernando asked about her day, her answer was:

“Bati perna o dia todo para resolver um monte de coisas.”

Translation: I walked around all day and ran several errands.

– end of sample–

51 Portuguese Idioms: Speak Like a Brazilian. Get your book using the links below and please come back to share your favorite expressions with us.

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